Cookbook Review: The Southern Foodie

SOUTH POLLSurvey the bookstore and you’ll notice that much of this season’s new cookbook crop hails from below the Mason-Dixon line. But not every book is singing the same Dixie tune: See how different cookbooks handle the Southern staple, okra. 

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THE SOUTHERN FOODIE: 100 PLACES TO EAT IN THE SOUTH BEFORE YOU DIE

by Chris Chamberlain ($25)

This Nashville native’s Okra, Corn and Tomatoes recipe is inspired by the beloved Ramsey’s Diner in Lexington, KY. Lest anyone question the recipe’s true Southern-ness, the no-fuss dish gets its flavor from bacon grease.

—Allyson Dickman, Assistant Lifestyle Editor

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Cookbook Review: The Glory of Southern Cooking

SOUTH POLL: Survey the bookstore and you’ll notice that much of this season’s new cookbook crop hails from below the Mason-Dixon line. But not every book is singing the same Dixie tune: See how four different cookbooks handle the Southern staple, okra. 

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THE GLORY OF SOUTHERN COOKING by James Villas ($23)

You could call Villas, an expert on everything from biscuits to bacon, the granddaddy of Southern food. He has six okra recipes here, and says that even squeamish non-Southern eaters will love Okra Fritters with Thousand Island Dressing, loaded with onion, green peppers and chili sauce.

—Allyson Dickman, Assistant Lifestyle Editor

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Cookbook Review: Fred Thompson’s Southern Sides

SOUTH POLLSurvey the bookstore and you’ll notice that much of this season’s new cookbook crop hails from below the Mason-Dixon line. But not every book is singing the same Dixie tune: See how different cookbooks handle the Southern staple, okra. 

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FRED THOMPSON’S SOUTHERN SIDES

by Fred Thompson ($35)

“No Southerner in hisor her right mind would be caught dead without a jar of pickled okra,” says this North Carolina native. And his Crunchy Pickled Okra recipe offers a superlocal serving suggestion: Split ’em open and stuff them with pimento cheese for Southern tapas.

—Allyson Dickman, Assistant Lifestyle Editor

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Cookbook Review: Southern Comfort

SOUTH POLL: Survey the bookstore and you’ll notice that much of this season’s new cookbook crop hails from below the Mason-Dixon line. But not every book is singing the same Dixie tune: See how different cookbooks handle the Southern staple, okra. 

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SOUTHERN COMFORT

By Allison Vines-Rushing and Slade Rushing ($35)

The husband-and-wife team behind the New Orleans restaurant MiLa gives down-home cooking a restaurant- kitchen spin. Exhibit A: Roasted Okra with Chili Oil, which gets a spicy Indian edge.

—Allyson Dickman, Assistant Lifestyle Editor

From the October Issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray

Cookbook Review: Now Eat This! Italian

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NOW EAT THIS! ITALIAN

By Rocco DiSpirito ($27)

Grazie, Rocco! The latest cookbook from this longtime luminary features Italian classics like creamy fettuccine alfredo, all trimmed to 350 calories max. And because the recipes come from real Italian mamas—who appear throughout the book—you know the calorie-cutting doesn’t compromise flavor.

From the September “Italian Issue” of Every Day with Rachael Ray

Cookbook Review: Crazy Good Italian

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CRAZY GOOD ITALIAN

By Mike Isabella ($35)

What do you get when you cross a Top Chef All-Star with an Italian-American childhood? Isabella’s first cookbook, which includes family traditions (check out Grandma’s Potato Gnocchi) and the chef’s own creations (remember that pepperoni sauce from Top Chef?). It’s a mix that totally says delizioso.

From our September “Italian Issue” of Every Day with Rachael Ray