Daily Bite: Coffee-Marshmallow Crispies with Chocolate & Cherries with Almonds
"This is like a Rice Krispies Treat meeting a grown-up trail mix: childhood meets adulthood, lowbrow meets highbrow. It’s my ‘don’t take yourself so seriously’ approach to baking.” —Christina Tosi, Pastry Chef at Momofuku Milk Bar

Daily Bite: Coffee-Marshmallow Crispies with Chocolate & Cherries with Almonds

"This is like a Rice Krispies Treat meeting a grown-up trail mix: childhood meets adulthood, lowbrow meets highbrow. It’s my ‘don’t take yourself so seriously’ approach to baking. —Christina Tosi, Pastry Chef at Momofuku Milk Bar

Coffee Break!

Between your daily cappuccino and those macchiatos you’ve been downing during sleep droughts, you’ve totally mastered Italian coffee-speak without even trying. So here’s the almost-as-effortless next step: latte art! Seriously. Rather than let the baristas have all the fun with foam, become your own Michelangelo of the mug—just by clicking on each photo above!

—Judith Pena, Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief

More Coffee Talk:

MOVE OVER, DARK ROAST: Blonde Roast (Coffee) is in!
A growing number of coffee brands like Starbucks are rolling out light-roast brews. Labeled “blonde,” the beans have spent less time in the roaster to coax out flavors more gently and make a lighter, less bitter-tasting drink with the same amount of caffeine. The companies claim that the beans’ natural sweetness nixes the need for milk and sugar. The verdict of our own blind tasting? Testers were pleasantly surprised by the smooth, mellow flavor, noting zero bitter bite and the same rich mouthfeel as darker coffee. Full disclosure, though: Many still craved a splash of dairy.
—Kate Parham
From our July/August Issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray
More coffee talk:
The First In-Car Espresso Machine
How To: Make Cold Brew Coffee
Dilution Solution: Coffee Ice Cubes

MOVE OVER, DARK ROAST: Blonde Roast (Coffee) is in!

A growing number of coffee brands like Starbucks are rolling out light-roast brews. Labeled “blonde,” the beans have spent less time in the roaster to coax out flavors more gently and make a lighter, less bitter-tasting drink with the same amount of caffeine. The companies claim that the beans’ natural sweetness nixes the need for milk and sugar. The verdict of our own blind tasting? Testers were pleasantly surprised by the smooth, mellow flavor, noting zero bitter bite and the same rich mouthfeel as darker coffee. Full disclosure, though: Many still craved a splash of dairy.

—Kate Parham

From our July/August Issue of Every Day with Rachael Ray

More coffee talk:

Emerging Trend: The Coffee and Wine Bar Hybrid

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News has been brewing—get it?—that coffee and wine hybrid bars are gaining popularity. Starbucks, for example, has been rumored to start selling booze soon, although I haven’t seen it yet…but what gives? Are coffee and wine really “pair-able?

"Wine and coffee have a bevy of similarities…Both have hundreds of chemical compounds that affect the flavor, with wine averaging 200–400 compounds and coffee surpassing 800. Where a wine drinker swirls a glass to release a wine’s aroma, a coffee drinker senses aromas on different areas of the palate. Both are complex, and the same grape or bean, respectively, can yield wildly different varietals

If you’re doing coffee right, you’re going to attract those who are already attracted to coffee,” he explains. “If you have wine available, there’s room for the bartender or barista actually to educate that consumer about wine, as well. … If they come into your establishment because you’re doing wine correctly, there’s room to expand the coffee market to them so they can broaden their enjoyment of the beverage world.

—Jason Haeger, Consultant for the Specialty Coffee Industry

The idea of broadening enjoyment of the beverage world in general sounds cool, so I’m intrigued to see if more of these wine-and-coffeeshop-combos pop up.

—Judith Pena, Asst. to the EIC

I love coffee—some may even call me obsessed—but I’m on the fence about how I feel about Fiat launching their first in-car coffee maker. I’m sure it will be great for those late nights when you feel yourself getting sleepy, but how good can this espresso really taste? What are your thoughts?

—Judith Pena, Assistant to the Editor-in-Chief

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